Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog

Tag Archives: Title VII

Supreme Court Holds That Only Employees Who Have Authority to Take Tangible Employment Actions Constitute Supervisors for the Purpose of Vicarious Liability Under Title VII

Our colleague Julie Saker Schlegel at Epstein Becker Green recently posted “Supreme Court Holds That Only Employees Who Have Authority to Take Tangible Employment Actions Constitute Supervisors for the Purpose of Vicarious Liability Under Title VII” on the Retail Labor and Employment Law blog, and we think hospitality employers will be interested. Following is an excerpt:

In a 5-4 decision the dissent termed “decidedly employer-friendly,” the Supreme Court held on June 24, 2013 that only employees who have been empowered by the employer to take tangible employment actions against a harassment victim constitute “supervisors” for the purpose of vicarious … Continue Reading

Employment “At-Will”: What UK Companies Doing Business in the US Need to Know

By Matthew Sorensen and Dana Livne

One of the major ways in which American employment law has traditionally differed from its British counterpart has been its entrenched employment “at-will” doctrine. The “at-will” employment doctrine provides employers with the right to terminate their relationships with their employees at any time, with or without notice or cause.  UK companies doing business in the US are often relieved to be advised that they become “at-will” employers to their US-based employees. In the US, unless an employer has entered an employment contract or collective bargaining agreement that expressly limits the employer or employee’s rights … Continue Reading

For Private Clubs, a Little “Discrimination” (in Membership) Can Go a Long Way!

By:      Mark M. Trapp

In these challenging economic times, many private clubs are finding it increasingly difficult to attract new members, or to retain existing members.  Over the last few years many clubs have lost members, and many more are facing substantial drops in revenues due to a decline in money spent by members on activities such as golfing or dining out.  Many golf, country and social clubs are finding it difficult to sustain their amenities and level of service. 

Because the economic situation is decreasing the potential membership pool, many clubs are offering incentives to join, such as reducing initiation … Continue Reading

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