Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog

Washington Court Dismisses Challenge to NLRB’s Ambush Election Rules

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My colleague Steven M. Swirsky at Epstein Becker Green published a Management Memo blog post concerning U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson granting summary judgment in favor of the NLRB – “Washington Court Dismisses Challenge to NLRB’s Ambush Election Rules.”

Following is an excerpt:

U.S. District Court Judge Amy Berman Jackson on Wednesday issued a 72 page opinion (PDF) rejecting each of the arguments raised by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the National Retail Federation and other business groups and found that the Amended Election Rules adopted by the National Labor Relations Board in December 2014, which took effect in April 2015, in an action that argued that the Board had exceeded its authority, violated the Administrative Procedures Act and that the Amended Rules were unconstitutional.

Read the full original post here.

EEOC Rules Discrimination Based On Sexual Orientation Illegal Under Title VII

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My colleagues Nancy L. Gunzenhauser, Kate B. Rhodes, and Judah L. Rosenblatt at Epstein Becker Green have a Retail Labor and Employment Law blog post concerning a recent EEOC modification to employment discrimination protection: “EEOC Rules Discrimination Based On Sexual Orientation Illegal Under Title VII.”

Following is an excerpt:

The EEOC held that “[s]exual orientation discrimination is sex discrimination because it necessarily entails treating an employee less favorably because of the employee’s sex.”  The EEOC noted that sex-based considerations also encompassed gender-based considerations under Title VII. This ruling, if accepted by federal courts, would extend protection under Title VII to decisions made on the basis of sexual orientation. While only the Supreme Court can issue a final, definitive ruling on the interpretation of Title VII, EEOC decisions are given significant deference by federal courts.

Read the full original post here.

EEOC Updates Pregnancy Discrimination Guidance

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My colleagues Nathaniel M. Glasser and Kristie-Ann M. Yamane (a Summer Associate) at Epstein Becker Green have published a Financial Services Employment Law blog post concerning recent modifications to pregnancy discrimination that will be of interest to many of our readers: “EEOC Updates Pregnancy Discrimination Guidance.”

Following is an excerpt:

In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Young v. UPS, [1]  the EEOC has modified those aspects of its Enforcement Guidance on Pregnancy Discrimination and Related Issues (“Guidance”) that deal with disparate treatment and light duty.

Under the prior guidance, issued in 2014, the EEOC asserted that a pregnant worker could prove a violation of the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (“PDA”) simply by showing that she was “treated differently than a non-pregnant worker similar in his/her ability or inability to work.”  The 2014 guidance also took the position that an employer could not refuse to offer a pregnant worker an accommodation by relying on a policy that provides light duty only to workers injured on the job.  The Supreme Court, however, was highly critical of and rejected this interpretation of the PDA, finding that it would require employers who provide a single worker with an accommodation to provide similar accommodations to all pregnant workers, irrespective of other criteria.

 Read the full original post here.

Proposed DOL Rule To Make More White Collar Employees Eligible For Overtime Pay

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I recently wrote a Wage and Hour Defense blog post with my colleague Michael S. Kun and it will be of interest to all hospitality employers – “Proposed DOL Rule To Make More White Collar Employees Eligible For Overtime Pay.”Clock

Following is an excerpt:

More than a year after its efforts were first announced, the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) has finally announced its proposed new rule pertaining to overtime. And that rule, if implemented, will result in a great many “white collar” employees previously treated as exempt becoming eligible for overtime pay for work performed beyond 40 hours in a workweek – or receiving salary increases in order that their exempt status will continue.

Read the full original post here.

Five EEOC Initiatives to Monitor on the Agency’s Golden Anniversary

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My colleague Nathaniel M. Glasser recently authored Epstein Becker Green’s Take 5 newsletter.   In this edition of Take 5, Nathaniel highlights five areas of enforcement that U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) continues to tout publicly and aggressively pursue.

  1. Religious Discrimination and Accommodation—EEOC Is Victorious in New U.S. Supreme Court Ruling
  2. Transgender Protections Under Title VII—EEOC Relies on Expanded Sex Discrimination Theories
  3. Systemic Investigations and Litigation—EEOC Gives Priority to Enforcement Initiative
  4. Narrowing the “Gender Pay Gap”—EEOC Files Suits Under the Equal Pay Act
  5. Background Checks—EEOC Seeks to Eliminate Barriers to Recruitment and Hiring

Read the Full Take 5 here.

Mayor Signs NYC Ban-the-Box Law

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On Monday, June 29, 2015, Mayor Bill de Blasio signed into law the bill passed by the New York City Council “banning-the-box.” The law goes into effect on Tuesday, October 27, 2015. As discussed in our earlier advisory, the ban-the-box movement removes from an employment application the “box” that requests criminal conviction history. New York City’s law also imposes additional requirements upon the employer when making an adverse employment decision on the basis of criminal conviction history.

NLRB Dramatically Educates Private School on Meaning of Concerted Protected Activity

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My colleague Nancy L. Gunzenhauser at Epstein Becker Green has a Management Memo blog post that will be of interest to many of our readers: “NLRB Dramatically Educates Private School on Meaning of Concerted Protected Activity. ”

Following is an excerpt:

While we have been reminding readers of the fact that  the National Labor Relations Act (the “Act”) protects employees regardless of whether they are represented by a union and the Act applies to non-unionized workforces, too, recently  a National Labor Relations Board (the “NLRB”) Administrative Law Judge issued a decision following an unfair labor practice (“ULP”)  hearing based on a charge filed by a teacher at New York City’s prestigious Dalton School that should serve as an object lesson for employers in all non-union businesses.

Read the full original post here.

Massachusetts AGO Provides Safe Harbor on New Sick Leave Law

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On May 1, 2015, we reported on proposed regulations to the Massachusetts paid sick leave law, which becomes effective on July 1, 2015.  The regulations have not yet been adopted, and in light of the uncertainty about many provisions of the law, the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office has issued a “Safe Harbor for Employers with Existing Paid Time Off Policies.”  Under the safe harbor, any employer with a paid time off policy in existence as of May 1, 2015, which provides employees with the right to use at least 30 hours of paid time off per year, will be deemed in compliance with the new sick leave law.  The safe harbor will expire on December 31 of this year, and as of January 1, 2016, all covered employers will be required to comply with the provisions of the new law. Our November 10, 2014 Advisory summarizes the law’s provisions and requirements.

The proposed regulations to the paid sick leave law, which would clarify employer obligations under law, remain under review by the Massachusetts Attorney General and during the comment period have been subject to considerable objection.  For this reason, and because the law carries the potential for substantial penalties for non-compliance, several employers and professional organizations have urged postponement of the law’s effective date.  Notwithstanding these objections, the law’s effective date remains July 1, 2015 and employers should prepare to comply.

The AGO has also published the earned sick time notice on its website.

DOJ Further Delays Release of Highly Anticipated Proposed Website Accessibility Regulations for Public Accommodations

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For those who have been eagerly anticipating the release of the U.S. Department of Justice’s proposed website accessibility regulations for public accommodations keyboard-4x3_jpgunder Title III of the ADA (the “Public Accommodation Website Regulations”), the wait just got even longer.  The recently released Spring 2015 Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions reveals that DOJ’s Public Accommodation Website Regulations are now not expected until April 2016.  This delay moves back the release date nearly a year from what most had previously anticipated; this summer in advance of July’s 25th Anniversary of the ADA.  While there was no public statement explaining the release, most insiders believe it has to do with the difficulty of appropriately quantifying the costs and benefits of complying with any promulgated regulations – a necessary step by DOJ for such a rulemaking.

Unfortunately for businesses across virtually all industries – including retail, hospitality & lodging, sports & entertainment, financial services, healthcare, and academia – places of public accommodation remain left to confront the issue of website accessibility without definitive standards adopted by the regulators.  This development is particularly frustrating because despite this delay, regulators at the federal and state level, advocacy groups, and private plaintiffs continue to aggressively pursue claims alleging that inaccessible websites violate Title III of the ADA and equivalent state accessibility laws.  Indeed, recent settlement agreements with DOJ have seen an increased focus on website accessibility (as well as the addition of mobile applications) and at the state level regulators are increasingly pursuing self-initiated compliance actions focused on allegations of inaccessible technology (including websites).

Despite the lack of formal regulations, companies seeking to assess the accessibility of their websites do have guidelines to look to that have obtained near-universal support.  Regulatory efforts to date (e.g., this past winter’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to revise and update Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act), recent settlements with DOJ and state regulators, and testimony during various stages of recent rulemaking efforts all point to the World Wide Web Consortium’s Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 (at the Level A and AA) as the appropriate measure of an accessible website.  Indeed, this sentiment was expressly echoed by DOJ during a presentation last month at the National ADA Symposium in Atlanta, Georgia.

For companies looking to explore this issue, assess their risk of exposure, and take steps to minimize their susceptibility to investigations or litigations there are clear steps to take.  First, websites should be audited – preferably under the protection of privilege – for compliance with WCAG 2.0 Level A and AA using both a user-based and programming-based dual approach.  Automated tools, in and of themselves, are insufficient.  Second, website accessibility policies – and practice and procedures to assist in their implementation – should be drafted and adopted to help manage the issue in the present and on a going forward basis.  Third, the necessary parties should be trained on these policies, practices, and procedures.  Finally, accessibility needs to become an integrated part of each company’s infrastructure and decision-making processes.  While these concepts may seem novel in the context of accessibility, most companies have already confronted analogous issues in the context of data privacy and security issues over the past decade.

 

 

First Challenge to NLRB’s New Election Rules Dismissed – Rules Held Constitutional

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My colleague, Steven M. Swirsky, published a Management Memo post that will be of interest to many of our readers: “First Challenge to NLRB’s New Election Rules Dismissed –Rules Held Constitutional.”

Following is an excerpt:

One of two lawsuits challenging the National Labor Relations Board’s authority to issue the expedited election rules that took effect on April 14, 2015, has now been dismissed by Judge Robert L. Pitman of the United States District Court for the Western District of Texas in Austin.  In his 27 page decision, Judge Pitman that the plaintiffs, including Associated Builders and Contractors of Texas and the National Federation of Independent Businessmen, could not establish that the NLRB’s December 14, 2014 rule “Representation – Case Procedures; Final Rule,” (the “New Rule”) should be declared by the Court to be invalid under the Administrative Procedures Act, that the New Rule violated employers’ rights under the National Labor Relations Act (the “Act”) by compelling them to provide unions with employees’ names and information before an election is directed or agreed to, by denying employers of their rights to a hearing prior to an election and by interfering with employers’ rights to free speech as provided for in Section 8(c) of the Act.

Read the full blog post here.

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