unfair labor practices

Our colleague Steven M. Swirsky, a Member of the Firm at Epstein Becker Green, has a post on the Management Memo blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the hospitality industry: “Can Your Corporate Social Responsibility Policy Make You a Joint-Employer With Your Suppliers? The NLRB May Find That It Does

Following is an excerpt:

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB or Board), which continues to apply an ever expanding standard for determining whether a company that contracts with another business to supply contract labor or services in support of its operations should be treated as a joint employer of the supplier or contractor’s employees, is now considering whether a company’s requirement that its suppliers and contractors comply with its Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Policy, which includes minimum standards for the contractor or supplier’s practices with its own employees can support a claim that the customer is a joint employer. …

Employers are well advised to review the full range of their operations and personnel decisions, including their use of contingent and temporaries and personnel supplied by temporary and other staffing agencies to assess their vulnerability to such action and to determine what steps they make take to better position themselves for the challenges that are surely coming.

Read the full post here.

Steve M. Swirsky

By Steven M. Swirsky

On Friday, November 16, I participated in a free 75-minute webinar discussion with Lafe E. Solomon, Acting General Counsel of the National Labor Relations Board.  The webinar was moderated by Terence H. McGuire of the Practical Law Company.  We discussed:

  • Factors that the NLRB considers when deciding whether to prosecute unfair labor practices based on these employment practices.
  • Legal considerations surrounding these employment practices besides compliance with the National Labor Relations Act.
  • The NLRB’s stance on what is and is not a lawful at will disclaimer.
  • Social Media and communications policies.
  • The NLRB’s position on employer requirements for confidentiality in connection with workplace investigations.
  • Waivers of the right to pursue claims in class actions.
  • What’s next on the NLRB’s prosecutorial agenda and how employers can prepare.

Click here to view this complimentary webinar, “Employment Practices Facing NLRB Scrutiny.”